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Discussion Starter #1
An idle discussion point... there must be a fine line between spending a wad of cash on chain cleaners and lube and replacing them... obvious chain failure issues aside... is there a law of diminishing returns?


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My drill.

Clean with GT85 and a chain brush.

Get out 5 litre can with 'chain oil' written on it. Decant into an old school oil can. Lube chain, wipe off excess.

'Chain oil' is basically the remnants of whatever oil l have used (so its a mix of bike oil, truck oil, 2t oil, chainsaw bar oil, atf and gear oil)

Chains last better than when using spray lubes.
 

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I also use soft links as split links are a pita. This cuts down on the list of stuff to check post ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I went up to see a bike with a mate and the owner turned out to be a keen trials enthusiast... most OCD clean bike I’ve ever seen. Used the same method but split his chain after every event and soaked it in a bolt box full of “chain oil” swore by it.

I’m always heavy with the chain cleaner but out here it’s a clean and dry job then a light spray with Motorex Offroad (dries and flakes off) or silicon spray... KTM say dry for the sand but you can get a lot of flash rust and your chain will wear regardless.


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Ipone used to do a good lube for sand riding ...... l used it for a while before going back to oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Some places showing it but lots of dead links... assume discontinued?


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Was going to say you run your chain dry in the desert, looks like it has gone a bit rusty but dont think it is actully rust. Remember many years ago there used to be sprockets for use in sand with a groove machined in it to help clear sand think they might have been called sidewinder, must have just been another trend/gimmic.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Run the rear steel/ally twin ring sprocket... they’re definitely worth fitting. The ally ones are like cheese in comparison.


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Was going to say you run your chain dry in the desert, looks like it has gone a bit rusty but dont think it is actully rust. Remember many years ago there used to be sprockets for use in sand with a groove machined in it to help clear sand think they might have been called sidewinder, must have just been another trend/gimmic.
if you look at the online catalogue of JT-Sprockets there is also a choice for offroad use i.e. they have a recess to allow any crud that gets between the chain roller and sprocket to flow away whilst getting crushed.

most classic racers remove the chain completely and clean it then put it either into a pot of oil and let it drip off over a week, or put in to a pot of grease and boil it... they have the link with locking plate (is that what you can split link?)

it sounds similar to what Lee and Miner mentioned.
 
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Ha ha! The chain grease that you had to heat up before dunking the chain in.

I remember a certain mother who was not best pleased at her 17yr old son who was doing that on the kitchen hob many moons ago ...........
 

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I'm with the "chain oil" method any old oil wiped round with a cloth after a clean with wd or similar.. always use steel rear and I change the front when it starts to hook seem to be able to make a chain last although I start off with a quality DID or similar
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ha ha! The chain grease that you had to heat up before dunking the chain in.

I remember a certain mother who was not best pleased at her 17yr old son who was doing that on the kitchen hob many moons ago ...........
Boiling chains in a pot in the kitchen... aye heard of that... father in law was a club racer and went onto classic racing later in life... I’m amazed Janice hasn’t murdered him yet.


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But in sand you do not want anything like grease or oil on the chain because sand sticks to it and makes great grinding paste, not the best lubrication for your chain and sprockets.
 

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Scottoiler, every time.

absolutely brilliant, I've not cleaned or lubed a chain in about 20 years of riding. Chain & sprockets last almost forever and chain adjustment is minimal.

was a bit of a bugger to fit to the RC8R compared to other bikes I've had, but not impossible once I'd worked out what was what.

anyone that says it puts oil everywhere has either [1] turned it too high &/or [2] dispenser nozzle isn't correct.

33566
 

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i've never cleaned a chain
just lube with GT85 after the ride or after a jet wash
DID's last me years...
 
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As others have said.. if the dirt chain is very dirty it'll get jet washed, then a spray with WD40 and maybe brush it in (old tooth brush). Then I towel off the WD & brush on used engine oil, and again towel off the excess.

Road bike chains get both cleaned and lubed with used engine oil (it's actually pretty clean still due to low mileage on the oil). Occasionally they need WD40 first but not often.

I find using just oil keeps the guards washed and clean, unlike chain spray greases which seem to collect grit.
I don't mind oil fling as it wipes off easy enough. I also don't shit myself if I see oil on the side of the tyre, in fact I use WD40 often (between rides) to clean the rear wheel.

So my cost is practically zero, and I don't mind the time as I like to see my chain and the rear wheel shining.
 
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