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Discussion Starter #1
need some help if poss. its an 06 950sm. they are radial brembos but does anyone know specifically what type of caliper. i want to remove the pistons, clean and grease them to negate my paranoia that they may start to stick. the brakes are starting to feel a little odd just before the bike comes to a complete halt. had this prob on a superduke i used to own and cured a lot of it by spinning the disc mounting bobbins to remove the shit that has accumulated in them over time. i will do this to the sm but want to strip and service the calipers for peace of mind. i have looked all over the forum for info but found nowt. any ideas or links to a service guide would be most appreciated.
enjoy the sun while it lasts!
cheers
oz
 

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All the discussions for the Superduke brakes apply equally to your SM as they are the same brakes (I believe).

Here goes:
- take the caliper off the fork
[do the next steps for one pair of pads at a time - it's easier]
- press in spring and pull out pad pin
- remove the retaining spring
- pull the pads out (remember which way round they came out)
- wedge something between the other 2 pads in the caliper
- pump two pistons out a bit (if only one is moving, hold it so the other is forced out
- flush that end of the caliper through with brake cleaner
- check for corrosion around where the edges where the pads go and clean it off
- put a bit of brake fluid on the pistons, and push them back in with your fingers
- if pistons stiff, pump out and push back in until not stiff
- clean the pads - I use a Stanley knife to scrap the crud off the edges and around the lining, and make sure you clean the edges - you might notice marks on the edge of the pads where they fit tight, or even worse, corrosion where they've been starting to stick to the caliper; you could even use a file on the edge of the pad backing
- put some copper slip round the edge of the pad backing (as well as a smear on the back) before replacing
- pads back in, copper slipping pad pins
- do the other 2 pads
- thread lock on caliper bolts when replacing
Job done.

Pistons can get a bit stiff, so getting the pistons out, cleaned and lubed is essential - you might find some of them a little stiff; pump them in and out a bit if they are bad. The specific worry with these brakes is the tight fit of the pads in the caliper, and lack of clearance for crud to escape. Even being quite anal about this, during the winter I did this and spotted the corrosion developing between pad and caliper (basically starting to weld them together). The marks on one edge of the pads give away that they pressing hard against the caliper when in use. I keep meaning the file the pad backings down a bit, but I get them apart every couple of months to be sure - a bit annoying, but it's not a big job. You could simplify it by taking pads out and cleaning without removing calipers, but I always want to make sure pistons are moving freely. Even today, after only light use since I last cleaned them in March (I think), I noticed that the bike was rolling easier afterwards - the pistons were sticking a little so they were dragging a bit.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks heaps for the reply and step by step. youre a bloody star!!!!!!!!!!!!! will get onto it pronto
cheers oz
 

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I should say, when pumping the pistons out a bit, go gently and just do it a little, you don't want any of them popping out or you'll be needing a bleed kit... Likewise when pushing them back into the caliper, do the opposing pistons a bit at a time each side, or pushing one in might force the opposite one to pop out.

Have fun!
 
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