KTM Owners Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

You've been really helpful when I've asked questions in the past so with this one I thought I'd contribute.

Purchased the ZenOverland full SAS removal kit thinking an hour's job and all would be done. It took fooooking ages and there aren't many guides out there.

I will add to this post the how to shortly, but if anyone has any questions for now PM me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Yep. Did mine the other day, just finished off today. Holy crap, it took hours.

I went for the Smart Moto option - blanking off plates, 02 eliminator etc etc - it all works perfectly with my JCE zorst.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Yep. Did mine the other day, just finished off today. Holy crap, it took hours.

I went for the Smart Moto option - blanking off plates, 02 eliminator etc etc - it all works perfectly with my JCE zorst.
did mine a couple of weeks ago, was a bit of a pain not knowing exactly how to get to the solenoid. used zen overland rottweiler blanking plates with smart moto o2 eliminators. both great companys to deal with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
So have you fitted a Jesters zorst then ?..... what do you think to it - sound and quality ?

I was on the fence to go with either JCE or Jesters. JCE won.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
to be honest i dont like the look of the JCE, the exit pipe isnt to my liking,and some of the research i did showed that the JCE can scrape on the ground damaging the exhaust tip.i also go with the theory about keeping the hot pipe on the fan side!! just my opinion though!!.
found the build quality of the Jester is exellent.im not fussed that the Jester is stainless steel over a titanium one. found Gez from Jester extremely good to deal with, nothing was too much trouble when i was researching which exhaust to go for.very happy with my purchase of the Jester system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I've got the Zen Overland full kit sitting on my work bench in the garage waiting to be fitted so any guidance would be most appreciated mate.
Cheers
Ade
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
to be honest i dont like the look of the JCE, the exit pipe isnt to my liking,and some of the research i did showed that the JCE can scrape on the ground damaging the exhaust tip.i also go with the theory about keeping the hot pipe on the fan side!! just my opinion though!!.
found the build quality of the Jester is exellent.im not fussed that the Jester is stainless steel over a titanium one. found Gez from Jester extremely good to deal with, nothing was too much trouble when i was researching which exhaust to go for.very happy with my purchase of the Jester system.
I managed to scrape my tip on the JCE but as far as quality goes it is a really nice bit of kit. Shame i ll be selling mine soon but i got a different exhaust to go on mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I started off by removing the middle fairings on both sides. Later on I found out you need to take off a load more to give you access to things so do this now. Take off the upper front fairings on both sides, then the nose section. Note the three torx inner 8mm hex outer bolts are of two different sizes so remember which ones come out of which.

Seat off, Steering damper off, tank off by undoing the steering damper bolts you’ve undone the front of the tank, the other two bolts are under the seat just in front of the battery. You’ll need to disconnect the wires, hose and the quick release fuel line from the under the tank at the battery end. I use a can of degreaser to hold the tank up between the airbox and the underside of the tank whilst I disconnect those bits. Stand the tank fuel hose end down against as wall (something soft at each end) it helps the tank not deform whilst it’s off the bike even though it’ll still be a pain in the ar$e to fit back on.

Top half of the airbox comes off easily. Bottom half FML.

With the top half off and the breather pipe removed you can access the throttle bodies. These are fiddly as hell to remove. Firstly undo all the cables. (the plugs are all different sizes so you can’t mix them up) then using a small allen key (3mm I think) undo the top clamp underneath each throttle body. These will be a pain to get to and you won’t be able to turn them much, but make sure you’re careful not to round them off. Once you’ve undone these carefully wiggle them out and remove the throttle cables. Then there’s the bottom clamps these should now be able to be undone. There is an access hatch to the right hand side of the box which undoes with 3 torx screws. You’ll have to undo two of these to release some cables that mount there.

I used wd40 and carefully sprayed through the tube around the airbox rubber seals then pulled like hell to get them off the heads. I used an insulated pry bar gently(ish) to try to get some movement as they’re on there so tight it’s a joke.

More to come.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Yeah guys say you don't need to lower rad or remove tank.....ha!! In middle of this now and removed damn near everything. Can't remove solenoid without lowering tank as I'm not stupid enough to simply cut hoses. I wanna have ability to return to stock if need be.
Not a bad job, but it's no 30 min job either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
I went for the easy option. I just plugged the hoses with 16mm ball bearings at the blanking plate end and switched off the SAS in Tune ecu. Does exactly the same job, but takes about 10 mins.
Also makes it very simple to return to stock if/when you decide to sell the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,601 Posts
^^ That's exactly what I did, cheap 'n' easy. :)
Though taking the time removing the extra .002g of hoses might make the bike mucho faster ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Yeap but carrying the extra 0.2Kg around town will slow you soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo much :censored:

I would say that if you are not doing trackdays the ballbearings are fine but if you are more of a racer then take them out. I took them out because my mechanic asked me if i would mind him doing it for free.....otherwise it would have been ball bearings as well :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Really could be done properly in about an hour. Hour and a half maybe.
Though i like wrenching. Finished my SAS removal tonight
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Yeah....I tinker. Ive got other things to do as well besides tinker with a bike that needs no tinkering.

But seeing as its sitting in my living room, and I look at it constantly....I break out the tools and mess with it. And I STILL have 4 months until I can ride it out of my house, so Ive got time. But nonetheless, its now accomplished. Just have to put fairings back on. But maybe Ill load the tune and uncheck the SAS and O2 boxes first and see if anything blows up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
This sounds the better option for me. How did you do it? Did you disconnect the hose at the blanking plate end, plug with the dia 16 ball bearing then cable tie the hose behind the fairing and fit blanking plates? I've read in various posts about a 15 minute reset when tinkering with the cpu, does this apply for this job. Any help, advice and guidance would be much appreciated.
Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
This sounds the better option for me. How did you do it? Did you disconnect the hose at the blanking plate end, plug with the dia 16 ball bearing then cable tie the hose behind the fairing and fit blanking plates? I've read in various posts about a 15 minute reset when tinkering with the cpu, does this apply for this job. Any help, advice and guidance would be much appreciated.
Cheers
I'm a little confused as to which 'method' you are referring to, but I just disconnected the hoses, plugged them with 16mm ball bearings and then reconnected them to the original plate. There is no need to fit blanking plates with this method.
I also turned off the SAS in Tune ecu and haven't bothered with the 15 min reset as I'm sure the bike will 'learn' everything it needs to when I take it for a spin.
Not only does it do the job, it also looks stock and is very easy to return to stock if ever I want to change the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,601 Posts
The only extra bit I did (which was probably not necessary), was to use a small cable tie the other side of the bearing to keep it in place within the hose. Don't forget, apart from the ball bearing, you will need some new hose clips to re-fit the hoses. When I finally removed it all & put it back to stock, my removed balls were a bit rusty :eek: , but the bike was 100% original and sold easily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
^^^Seems like a nice easy way to do it. If I would do it again maybe id simply do this, or if I lived somewhere without 9 months of downtime Id do this. But Ive got infinite amounts of time...and my bike was damn near apart anyways for other reasons so I jumped in at it.

From a restoration standpoint you cant beat that method above^^ 3 minute fix!
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top