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Would a 350 motor last longer in average hands? I’m thinking it wouldn’t get thrashed as much…
 

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That's why I wanted a 350. Not for its sheer speed, but it's get me out of trouble at the twist of a throttle while generally being ridden at the bottom half of the rev range. I've got no doubt that a modern FI 250 is a great bike and probably more suited to my ability for most purposes. I used to have a carb 250 and my dad still had one, and while it goes well when ridden hard and well (Jarvis won valleys extreme on one a few years back!), for me I prefer riding at the lower end, it's great for lugging a higher gear on slippery grass and on bigger hills the power is endless. As for longevity, the 350 in my hands seems to be going the distance. Its on 180ish hours on its original piston, starts and runs perfectly and doesn't use any oil. I may change the piston this winter, just as a just in case insurance, but I'm not worried about it at the moment.
 

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Are you saying the 250 4 stroke is an over all better bike than the 350 4 stroke? They seem to be a little cheaper and I guess lighter but surely the power is quite there?
I tried a load of bikes at an Ady Smith day and was surprised how different the 250 and 350 feel considering almost identical weight, the 250 felt lighter and easier to ride, possibly down to power delivery being softer and maybe due to less rotating mass in the engine?

Whatever causes it, for me as a very shit off road rider (what happens when you try something new in your late 40's!) I found the 250 easier on the Enduro course, also switched between my FE350 and other mates bikes on Enduro fun days, mates CRF250X also felt easier to ride around MX / Enduro tracks, where my 350 was just a bit lairy with me trying to control it, however on the 250's I probably do 5-10 times more gear changes than on the 350 where I can just stick it in 3rd or 4th and leave it there most the time.

Back on the Lanes / riding around in the dirt on Salisbury Plain which is what I mainly do on the bike and the 350 is great, the low down power is really useful, the flexibility means fewer gear changes - which I am still crap at standing up on rough terrain, it has a good turn of speed and cruises nicely at 50-60mph on the road, and will top 90MPH even with a smaller front sprocket fitted (Useful on the Autobahn)

In my novice \ unskilled view:

250 4T - Easiest on Track
350 4T - Best do-it-all bike for green lanies and the odd Enduro fun day.
300 2T - Biggest grins and most fun, possibly would make a decent trail bike for me, but prefer longevity of 4T
500 4T - Surprisingly easy to ride at a steady pace, probably make a nice trail bike, but a bit too lairy and the slightest bit of "Whisky Throttle" would see me in trouble, occasionally catch a bump wrong and do it on the 350 and have a bit of an "oh-shit" moment, the 500 would just launch me into the bushes, a 250 would just bog a bit and let me off really easily.

I suspect a lot of riders over-bike themselves for racing, and shy away from a larger bike that might work well for them on the trails.

Same with road bikes, a 1000CC bike can great on the road, lots of torque and mid range to drive about with, but on the track an absolute handful.
 

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Sounds like a solid bike and a solid deal there mate 👌 yeah the 2ts will burn a lot more due to higher rpm I guess, same as a diesel vs petrol.
No, it has nothing to do with rpm, a 350 revs over 11000 and two strokes up to 9 or 9500. Its just the way the engines are designed. Twostrokes waste more fuel than 4 strokes and only have a very narrow range where they burn fuel good.
 
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Are you saying the 250 4 stroke is an over all better bike than the 350 4 stroke? They seem to be a little cheaper and I guess lighter but surely the power is quite there?
Watch the top boys, a 250F can be amazing in the right hands. Also doesn't tire you out like a 350F will, so may be the faster bike for most hobby riders too.

If racing a 250F needs to be ridden hard and can often be out-dragged by 2 strokes and bigger 4 strokes unless you can carry the speed, which isn't always so easy on H&H events where you may be speed limited out the corners by other riders for example. 250F may be cheaper but also harder to sell as less desirable than 350, so overall the cost of ownership aint too different. Other downside of 250F is they are less exciting to ride if you like power!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
Just noticed in a ad whilst looking for a 350, the owner states that the engine oil idler gear has been upgraded, and they wouldn't own one without that being done. It's a 2019 model and another one I'm looking at (supposed to be actually going up and collecting) is a 2020 model.

Started doing a little search and it seems some people have had some serious issues with the plastic sprockets or gears in the engine oil idler (whatever that is). Has this issue been sorted or what's the crack with that? Is it something I should be concerned about and changing it out for an upgraded set?
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Never heard of that before.
Sounds like a weak spot in the bike. Going to look into it a bit more now but sounds like ktm are not using metal and people are having the sprocket/s brake, causing all sorts of issues. I'm assuming it plays a part in lubricating the engine, if that goes then then engines next
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Okay, so I've found some info. Sounds like they might of sorted it out.

Apparently ktm have been using a certain plastic compound that's weak and goes flexible.

It's the 6000 gear but they've now upgraded to 6001. Absolute madness that they've used something like that. Surely after all these years of manufacturing they're engineers are aware of potential, simple issues like this. Crappy plastic compound in such a vulnerable area.

For piece of mind I mind just swap them out for metal ones anyway tbh. Seems easy to do and relatively cheap.

 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Watch the top boys, a 250F can be amazing in the right hands. Also doesn't tire you out like a 350F will, so may be the faster bike for most hobby riders too.

If racing a 250F needs to be ridden hard and can often be out-dragged by 2 strokes and bigger 4 strokes unless you can carry the speed, which isn't always so easy on H&H events where you may be speed limited out the corners by other riders for example. 250F may be cheaper but also harder to sell as less desirable than 350, so overall the cost of ownership aint too different. Other downside of 250F is they are less exciting to ride if you like power!!!
I think I'd prefer the extra power that the 350 will give. Tbh, I'm stabbing in the dark a bit here mate. I have never ridden an exc or exc-f of any form I.e cc, year and so on. I'm literally just going off my best guess, some information all you guys have so kindly given me and I guess a hunger for a change. Never had a 4 stroke off road bike before and feel I might really enjoy it.....but we'll see.

Half the reason I'm gunning for the 2020 one I'm going to see on Sunday is just so it's sounds a bit newer when/if I want to sell and swap out for a 300 exc 2 stroke in a couple years time. Should hold its value a bit more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
No, it has nothing to do with rpm, a 350 revs over 11000 and two strokes up to 9 or 9500. Its just the way the engines are designed. Twostrokes waste more fuel than 4 strokes and only have a very narrow range where they burn fuel good.
Ah okay, that's interesting. 2 strokes sound like they're revving extremely high. I guess 9000 rpm is quite high but nothing like a lot of other bikes i.e Road bikes. Some cars rev to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
I tried a load of bikes at an Ady Smith day and was surprised how different the 250 and 350 feel considering almost identical weight, the 250 felt lighter and easier to ride, possibly down to power delivery being softer and maybe due to less rotating mass in the engine?

Whatever causes it, for me as a very shit off road rider (what happens when you try something new in your late 40's!) I found the 250 easier on the Enduro course, also switched between my FE350 and other mates bikes on Enduro fun days, mates CRF250X also felt easier to ride around MX / Enduro tracks, where my 350 was just a bit lairy with me trying to control it, however on the 250's I probably do 5-10 times more gear changes than on the 350 where I can just stick it in 3rd or 4th and leave it there most the time.

Back on the Lanes / riding around in the dirt on Salisbury Plain which is what I mainly do on the bike and the 350 is great, the low down power is really useful, the flexibility means fewer gear changes - which I am still crap at standing up on rough terrain, it has a good turn of speed and cruises nicely at 50-60mph on the road, and will top 90MPH even with a smaller front sprocket fitted (Useful on the Autobahn)

In my novice \ unskilled view:

250 4T - Easiest on Track
350 4T - Best do-it-all bike for green lanies and the odd Enduro fun day.
300 2T - Biggest grins and most fun, possibly would make a decent trail bike for me, but prefer longevity of 4T
500 4T - Surprisingly easy to ride at a steady pace, probably make a nice trail bike, but a bit too lairy and the slightest bit of "Whisky Throttle" would see me in trouble, occasionally catch a bump wrong and do it on the 350 and have a bit of an "oh-shit" moment, the 500 would just launch me into the bushes, a 250 would just bog a bit and let me off really easily.

I suspect a lot of riders over-bike themselves for racing, and shy away from a larger bike that might work well for them on the trails.

Same with road bikes, a 1000CC bike can great on the road, lots of torque and mid range to drive about with, but on the track an absolute handful.
Wow, you started late. What was you doing for the 30 years prior? 😂 what made you suddenly get into it?

I wish I had the opportunity to ride a few different bikes but unfortunately that's not the case so I'm just diving in the deep end and going for it. I was used to batteling with a sx 125 round the enduro track and using the clutch a hell of a lot so this 350 4 stroke is going to be a shock to the system.

Not that I won't be able to handle it, I think I'm going to be taken back by how much easier it'll be and probably kick myself for not making the change sooner. So bloody excited.

The 125 2 stroke just didn't have any low down grunt and I had to rev the nuts out of it, dip the clutch and then the power would kick in and front wheel would start lifting.
 

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Ah okay, that's interesting. 2 strokes sound like they're revving extremely high. I guess 9000 rpm is quite high but nothing like a lot of other bikes i.e Road bikes. Some cars rev to that.
Yes, its the sound.... a 2 stroke engine provides twice the bang. On a 4 stroke engine, combustion occurs every other time the piston reaches the top of the cylinder, but on a two stroke, it happens every time. So you have two explosions in the same time period of the single explosion on a 4 stroke.

9000 is high for a two stroke.
 
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Okay, so I've found some info. Sounds like they might of sorted it out.

Apparently ktm have been using a certain plastic compound that's weak and goes flexible.

It's the 6000 gear but they've now upgraded to 6001. Absolute madness that they've used something like that. Surely after all these years of manufacturing they're engineers are aware of potential, simple issues like this. Crappy plastic compound in such a vulnerable area.

For piece of mind I mind just swap them out for metal ones anyway tbh. Seems easy to do and relatively cheap.


There's another thread on here about it with more detail and photos.

 

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Wow, you started late. What was you doing for the 30 years prior? 😂 what made you suddenly get into it?
30 Years spending most of my spare cash / time with road bikes, touring, track days etc.

Was flogging a road bike and the guy wanting to buy it said he just needed to flog his DRZ400S - so I took it in part ex and started green laning. Not looking to be the next Romaniacs winner, or even race for that matter, but like having the odd day out on dirt and a bike that I can get a lot of fun from in Winter.
 

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My 2018 TPi has been fine. Split oil tank at 90hrs. That’s about it.Mind I do look after it. Some don’t and that’s the issue with a 2nd hand purchase.
I think the later models have had more issues. Lack of power, buggered ambient sensors etc…

Hope you find what your looking for 👍🏼
 

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So what type of maintenence is required to keep a battery working consistently? Obviously with a car or a road bike they're used daily but an enduro bike may only be every two weeks, maybe less, maybe more but not every day so do they need to be on a trickle charger or something?

I don't understand why I've seen a few people stuck without being able to start there bike, surely it's not that difficult to ensure it's going be okay but seeing that's made me think is there some flaw to it
Get yourself an optimate battery charger, comes with plug which can be connected to the battery. Also I’ve not needed one yet but if your really concerned about getting stranded I’ve seen people carry a jump battery about the size and weight of a mobile phone.

the people you’ve witnessed stuck with a dead battery may not have had the idle set correctly and may not have had decent clutch control leading to a lot of cough stalls leading to a high number of engine restarts.

mine when i bought it recently (its a 2014 350) wasn’t the best to start, took a few turns off the motor before bursting into life, did all the valve gaps, spark plug etc but it was the fuel filter on the pump which needed replacement. Basically if it’s maintained properly it shouldn’t be a problem.
 

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A lithium battery will not need to be maintained like a lead acid one. They hold charge for months, no problem. Just 'top up' once a year if need be, using a lithium charger (Noco) - DO NOT TRICKLE CHARGE.
 

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My 2018 TPi has been fine. Split oil tank at 90hrs. That’s about it.Mind I do look after it. Some don’t and that’s the issue with a 2nd hand purchase.
I think the later models have had more issues. Lack of power, buggered ambient sensors etc…

Hope you find what your looking for 👍🏼
Yes, maintain the bike and it will be your friend, neglect even the basics and you will know about it.

IMO, aside from using decent oil and changing often, air filter prep is important. Clean after every ride, clean airbox interior as well, oil filter with putoline action fluid, not the crappy spray on, and grease the mating surface. I use petrol to get worst of dirt off, then was out in a bucket of soapy water, then rinse from inside out, dry and re oil for later use. I have a few in the go so there is always a clean one (oh, wash the bike with old filter still on, but with a plastic bag over it). I have been cleaning filters with petrol for 20 years and not had a problem ...........
 
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