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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here are some of the more common issues posted about.

If you disagree with anything on here then please let me know - I'm used to being wrong.

Before you read this I'd like to point out that not everyone will experience all, or even any, of these features.

Some issues will manifest themselves on brand new bikes but disappear after a thousand miles or so as the bike beds in.
Some dealers are a lot better than others at solving problems. KTM Austria seem to be generally very helpful when all else fails.
Bernie Tiller is the guy responsible for tech support for KTM in the UK - [email protected]

Some FAQ's

Stalling
The RC8 is a high capacity, high compression V-Twin with a light flywheel. Running at low rpm (below idle speed) will probably result in a stall. This can lock the back wheel especially in the wet. The 2011 is fitted with a heavier flywheel so not as prone to stalling.

Most slow speed stalls can be prevented by keeping the engine above its idle revs, in a low gear at slow speeds and properly warming the engine before riding. Use the clutch.

The stalling is usually worse when the bike is new and lessens as the engine gets some mileage on it.
Other causes of stalling include -
a vaccum forming in the tank due to faulty breathers/fuel cap seals.
Collapsed petrol filter causing inconsistant fuel pressures.
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) misreading and requires recalibrating
Throttle butterfly valves misaligned and require rebalancing - CAUTION screwing this up can have serious implications and may cause engine damage and lock ups.

High Speed Stalling
This is where the engine stalls and locks during downshifts at speed. This is under investigation at present with no certified cause or remedy.
This is not a particularly common problem.
It may be more likely with engines that aren't fully up to temperature.
One possible cause may be engine braking combined with the clutch switch. This was diagnosed on the 990 but has not been confirmed on the RC8.
This is where the engine management system is supposed to bleed fuel to the engine, when running over 5000 rpm, when the throttle is closed if the clutch is pulled in to stop the engine stalling. If the clutch is out then the ecu does not feed fuel as the momentum of the bike keeps the engine turning. However if the ecu fails to detect that the clutch is pulled in then it cuts fuel to the engine as normal but the engine stalls and locks up. One possible solution is to short the clutch switch wires so the ecu is fooled into thinking the clutch is always pulled in. However this would impact engine braking.

Problems selecting neutral
Quite a common one this with 2 main causes. Misaligned gear selector linkage or air in the clutch slave unit.
Solution 1 - check the linkage works correctly, doesn't foul anywhere and the rod ends are in good condition and not seized solid.
Solution 2 - replace the clutch slave unit. The OE unit seems to be susceptable to air bubbles. I've personally fitted the Oberon unit and found it works very well.
Remember to use mineral clutch fluid. Magura Blood is the recommended (expensive) option but I've used Comma LHM+ Mineral with no problems.

Surging
Usually caused by SAS feedback. Or unbalanced throttle bodies.
Solution - disconnect SAS and/or balance throttle valves. The throttle bodies should self balance so any problems may be down to sensors misreading. CAUTION screwing up throttle balancing can damage the engine and cause lockups.

15 minute reset
This is a calibration technique used to reset the ECU baseline. This can solve various fueling issues.
Personally I recommend doing this when the seasons change or whenever a deterioration in performance is noticed.
Technique - Ensure tank has sufficient fuel - ensure fuel is the usual fuel that will be run - Turn on ignition - do not touch throttle - start bike - do not touch throttle - allow to run for 15 mins - do not touch throttle - turn off - do not touch throttle.

Oil leaks
Common leak locations are the bottom seal of the filler tube and the water pump. These should be sorted under warantee and are normally caused by incorrectly installed seals.
Another common apparent oil leak is the down the back of the rear cylinder. This is caused by oil being blown out of the engine breather at high rpm. The cure is to fit a catch tank or rebreather kit which directs the breather vent into the rear throttle body. Some models have these solutions fitted as standard.
The KTM rebreather kit 69006002244 replaces the upper airbox shell on all model RC8s and directs the oil mist into the throttle body.

Instrument panel misting
Yes, this happens. Best solution is to strip the panel down, spray helmet demister onto the back of the display glass and reassemble.

Wobby mirrors
The mirrors on most bikes will move while riding. There are several ways to reduce this.

Remove mirror, degrease ball and socket, and replace.
or place mirror in required position and glue in place with silicone sealant.
or remove mirror, degrease and roughen ball, replace mirror
or remove mirror, reinforce socket with Jubilee clip or similar, replace mirror
or remove mirror, cut off finger from washing up glove and pull over ball, replace mirror.

Exhausts and mapping
Race maps should not be used with the OE cat in the pipes as the over fuelling can set the cat alight.
It is recommended that any race can is remapped on a dyno to get the best results.

Yes, the exhaust gets hot. Some riders find the heat excessive on their right leg. Possible solutions are wrapping the pipe or ceramic coating. Ceramic Coaters

RC8R 2010/2011 Comparison
The 2010 'R has slightly larger engine than the std RC8. This and other changes increased the power to 150 rwhp. Light weight wheels and uprated suspension over the original.
The 2011 'R has twin spartk engine with heavier crankshaft to improve low rpm stall behaviour. The engine changes coupled with a softer throttle cam combine to make the bike easier to ride at lower engine speeds. The 2011 lost the light wheels (budget restraints) and the suspension is softer, more road biased.

SAS - Gleaned from forum so not necessarily 100%...
KTM's method of bleeding air into the exhaust to reduce emmisions. Possible cause of surging especially when combined with unbalanced injector butterflies. Easy to blank off - harder to completely remove. SAS blanking plates available from various sources.

O2 Sensor Eliminator fitting
RHS fairing has to come off and then you'll need to cut the cable tie that keeps the join between the sensor and where ever the cable ends up tucked behind the frame.It will pay to have a new cable tie ready to coil the cable back up and secure it back to the frame.
LHS the small fairing under the seat should be removedto make it easier to reach the join in the cable and if I remember there is a cable tie involved there too.I also had to lift the tank to gain access to the bolts that hold the small fairing. - Thanks rocket60

RC8 Fork caps
The adjustment on top of the forks on the non R models are known to move whilst riding. This can be remedied by fitting the 'R' fork caps which have positive locating notches. This should be able to be remedied by a dealer under warranty.

Tyre pressures
KTM recommended tyre pressure RC8R solo rider - cold - front 36 psi, rear 36 psi

Suspension Setting
Suspension setting linky

Gearing calculator
A useful web based calculator for checking the results of fitting different size sprockets. Gearing Commander - with thanks to dregtv

Goldfish
Not all bikes were supplied with a headlight goldfish. This can be rectified by pivoting the instrument console forward and up to access the rear of the head light. Remove the bulb and rubber seal. Install goldfish ensuring sufficient water is present. replace bulb and instrument console.

GPI
Regarded as essential kit by some riders.

Forum Users
Sorry but there's no solution for them.:rolleyes:

Many thanks to all the members who have unwittingly contributed to these FAQs.
All bike owners are considered sentient beings and as such are solely responsible for their actions.
If any advice given in these F.A.Q.s results in the removal of someone stoopid from the evolutionary tree then please ensure that there is sufficient video coverage so I can have a evil, manical laugh at their expense.

Manuals etc

Manuals and Part PDFs and Links moved to here due to post getting too big.

Step thoughs

SAS removal instructions

Clutch Slave Cylinder Replacement

Tank replacement - getting those pesky bolts back in the easy way
 

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Re gold fish,mine is the non R version and appears to be fitted with a stickle back would I be able to get this sorted under warranty.
 

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Here are some of the more common issues posted about.

Some FAQ's

Stalling
The RC8 is a high capacity, high compression V-Twin with a light flywheel. Running at low rpm (below idle speed) will probably result in a stall. This can lock the back wheel especially in the wet. The 2011 is fitted with a heavier flywheel so not as prone to stalling.
The stalling is usually worse when the bike is new and lessens as the engine gets some mileage on it.
Other causes of stalling include -
a vaccum forming in the tank due to faulty breathers/fuel cap seals.
Collapsed petrol filter causing inconsistant fuel pressures.
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) misreading and requires recalibrating
Throttle butterfly valves misaligned and require rebalancing

Surging
Usually caused by SAS feedback. Often exagerated by unbalanced throttle valves.
Solution - disconnect SAS and/or balance throttle valves.

15 minute reset
This is a calibration technique used to rest the ECU baseline. This can solve various fueling issues.
Technique - Ensure tank has sufficient fuel - ensure fuel is the usual fuel that will be run - Turn on ignition - do not touch throttle - start bike - do not touch throttle - allow to run for 15 mins - do not touch throttle - turn off - do not touch throttle.

Oil leaks
Common leak locations are the bottom seal of the filler tube and the water pump. These should be sorted under warantee and are normally caused by incorrectly installed seals.
Another common apparent oil leak is the down the back of the rear cylinder. This is caused by oil being blown out of the engine breather at high rpm. The cure is to fit a catch tank or rebreather kit which directs the breather vent into the rear throttle body. Some models have these solutions fitted as standard.

Instrument panel misting
Yes, this happens. Best solution is to strip the panel down, spray helmet demister onto the back of the display glass and reassemble.

Exhausts and mapping
Race maps should not be used with the OE cat in the pipes as the over fuelling can set the cat alight.
It is recommended that any race can is remapped on a dyno to get the best results.

Yes, the exhaust gets hot. Some riders find the heat excessive on their right leg. Possible solutions are wrapping the pipe or ceramic coating. Ceramic Coaters

Goldfish
Not all bikes were supplied with a headlight goldfish. This can be rectified by pivoting the instrument console forward and up to access the rear of the head light. Remove the bulb and rubber seal. Install goldfish ensuring sufficient water is present. replace bulb and instrument console.

GPI
Regarded as essential kit by some riders.

Forum Users
Sorry but there's no solution for them.:rolleyes:
Nice one bear :D
 

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I'm sorry but this thread is downright irresponsible - how can you post an instruction to install headlight goldfish 'with sufficient water' but without any mention at all of nutrients? And it seems some other forum members actually find that funny. Takes my breath away. I have sent a strongly worded report on your actions to the RSPCF - expect a visit my friend :mad:

(And come to think of it I'm not at all sure bears should be allowed to ride bikes, I feel another report coming on.)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
All original KTM headlights come with a nutrient coating on the headlight lens. The nutrient level of this coating is maintained by insects impacting on the lens at sufficient velocities. All law enforcement agencies are aware of this need to travel at high velocities to feed the goldfish, however individual officers may need politely reminding.

Your other comment is offensive and bearist. Carry on in this vein and you will be reported.
 

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called winnie the pooper for sure...

My Goldfish likes to travel btw
 

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Discussion Starter #12
a little information about setting suspension.
Note - this is a generic starting point for a litre class track bike.
All bikes, riders and circuits will have different ideal settings. This data is simply a good starting point.

First fully extend the forks, this is done by pivoting the bike on its sidestand or with an under yoke paddock stand, until the front wheel is clear of the ground and the weight of the wheel is pulling the forks down.
Measure the length of exposed fork slider and record it.

Do the same for the rear wheel - note this cannot be done with a conventional rear paddock stand. Either pivot the bike on the sidestand or use footrest type paddock stands until the rear wheel is clear of the ground and the wheel is free to pull the swingarm down to its lowest position.
Measure from the rear wheel spindle vertically up to a marked point on the rear seat and record it.

Set the bike back on its wheels and bounce the suspension to settle it.
Remeasure the fork length and rear shock heights.

The difference between the first readings ang these second readings is the STATIC SAG.
It should be about 28mm on th forks and 12-15mm on the rear.
The Static Sag measurement is the one set by adjusting the Preload.

Next sit the rider on the bike in their typical riding pose and measure the forks and rear again.
This is the Rider Sag.
It should be approx 35mm on the forks and 20-25mm on the rear.
The Rider Sag is adjusted by changing the springs - not by frigging with preload.

Rebound and Compression damping should have almost no effect on the sags.
 

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a little information about setting suspension.
Note - this is a generic starting point for a litre class track bike.
All bikes, riders and circuits will have different ideal settings. This data is simply a good starting point.

First fully extend the forks, this is done by pivoting the bike on its sidestand or with an under yoke paddock stand, until the front wheel is clear of the ground and the weight of the wheel is pulling the forks down.
Measure the length of exposed fork slider and record it.

Do the same for the rear wheel - note this cannot be done with a conventional rear paddock stand. Either pivot the bike on the sidestand or use footrest type paddock stands until the rear wheel is clear of the ground and the wheel is free to pull the swingarm down to its lowest position.
Measure from the rear wheel spindle vertically up to a marked point on the rear seat and record it.

Set the bike back on its wheels and bounce the suspension to settle it.
Remeasure the fork length and rear shock heights.

The difference between the first readings ang these second readings is the STATIC SAG.
It should be about 28mm on th forks and 12-15mm on the rear.
The Static Sag measurement is the one set by adjusting the Preload.

Next sit the rider on the bike in their typical riding pose and measure the forks and rear again.
This is the Rider Sag.
It should be approx 35mm on the forks and 20-25mm on the rear.
The Rider Sag is adjusted by changing the springs - not by frigging with preload.

Rebound and Compression damping should have almost no effect on the sags.
did i not just read this on another thread deja fooking vu :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Links To Manuals and Part lists


Manuals etc

A few useful links for manuals etc. with many thanks to cageyar.

http://www.ktm-parts.com/pdf/KTM2010/2010_1190RC8RAKRA.pdf

http://www.ktm-parts.com/pdf/KTM2010/2010_1190RC8RRB.pdf

http://www.ktm-parts.com/pdf/KTM2010/2010_1190RC8R.pdf

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/672-1190-rc8-r-track-eu-1190-rc8-r-track-eu-zawieszeniepdf

http://ktmracing.co.il/_Uploads/dbsAttachedFiles/CHASSISRC8R1190.pdf

http://ktmracing.co.il/_Uploads/dbsAttachedFiles/ENGINERC8R1190.pdf

Found the RC8R 2011 EU Black chassis parts catalog.
The engine catalog for this model is the same number posted previously with the EU White chassis catalog:

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/666-1190-rc8-r-black-eu-1190-rc8-r-black-eu-zawieszeniepdf

And here's the Track USA model - previous Track posting was for the EU model; not sure of the difference, if any....but there are two catalogs:

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/674-1190-rc8-r-track-usa-1190-rc8-r-track-usa-zawieszeniepdf

Here's the RC8 2009 EU Orange:

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/190-1190-rc-8-orange-zawieszenie.pdf

RC8 2009 EU Black:

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/186-1190-rc-8-black-zawieszenie.pdf

RC8 2009 EU White:

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/194-1190-rc-8-white-zawieszenie.pdf

RC8 2009 EU Engine:

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/185-1190-rc-8-black-silnik.pdf

And lastly, something called the 1190 RC8 Black RRS EU 2009:

http://www.ktmsklep.pl/userfiles/file/pdf/188-1190-rc-8-black-rrs-zawieszenie.pdf

KTM Plugs and Connectors

With thanks to Dregtv

http://www.cycletownsouth.com/Spare_Parts_Manual/ktm%20spare%20connectors.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #17
did i not just read this on another thread deja fooking vu :confused:
I thought I'd stick it in the F.A.Q.s for when the other post vanishes into the ether.
 

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The wheep hole, no fooking mention 'bout the wheep hole on first year RC'8s
 
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