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STIC development: within thirty days the new .114A will be available along with the current .113A; this was already planned in fact, eventually there will a “STIC-Six-Pack” that will consist of tubes ranging from .112” to .116.”

FYI; for the last year the .113A has been tested extensively in various temperatures and altitudes ranging from sea level to 12,000 feet (South America). With the new JD Jetting STIC kit (STIC specific); this is a great combination. We have found the .113A with the JD STIC Red (II-II) to be cleaner on the bottom and with the smaller tip (.055”) it has sufficient flow versus the N3EJ at the tip at (.075”).

The JD Jetting kit for the STIC is STIC specific. For those needing more fuel at the bottom, the JD Blue (IIII) for the STIC has a top diameter that is slightly smaller, approximately — (.1062”) versus the Red for the STIC at approximately (.1072”). Contrary to the consensus I am not frustrated with the jetting; with the help of JD Jetting, we now have a Jetting kit for the STIC. Here are some key issues; the smaller STIC outlet is more aggressive in blending the pilot jet fuel and air into the central flow. The frontal air screw does siphon break the larger pilot to some degree and the range of the air screw can be from 2½ turns to +4 turns out; this air source intersects the pilot jet in the middle just before the outlet; just after the jet orifice restriction. The air screw setting supplies air to the STIC power circuit. The STIC power system engages just off idle blends the pilot jet fuel and its related air sources into the main system.

As many of you may know I am now 77-years old (do not ride) and I depend on input from the end-users and those that are avid tuners. Originally the STIC was developed for aggressive motocross; however, a lot of the two-stroke riders were using the STIC for aggressive trails and other types of finesse racing. This required the STIC to be jetted for more finesse at the slower speeds. Riders like Mark from TOKYO Off-Road and many others were instrumental in selecting the 2.2870mm (aka .113”) tube. Thanks to those people and James from JD jetting; we now have a great product. Yes, we know there are many combinations that are dictated by engine modifications and the driver's demand. This requires making adjustments, I am sure that no system is adjustment-free including fuel injection with its closed-loop systems (meaning it has sensors that give input to the computer program); even this requires human input to design the mapping system. In fact, for every possible combination there is no free ride to calculate and predict the ever-changing dynamics.
 

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dmills; thanks for your valued input. As we all know, most new carburetors come with universal jetting and settings. Look at the Mikuni and Keihin jetting handbook; there are enough jets, tubes, and needle to drive someone nuts in selecting the best possible combinations. During the STIC development it was tested extensively for the hot motocross market. I did not realize there were so many people running different types of racing, Motocross, Endurance racing, hot trail, hill climbs, pleasure riding through the area woods, and hills (wow, who knew). The bottom line it takes a lot to make everyone happy — however, I am trying to make this a great experience; yes, I am listening to everyone that is posting. STIC development is ongoing (there will not be .111A) with current products as well as other new products that will be available very soon.

For the enthusiast, thank the persons of Jeff (MX South), Derek Harris (Harris Performance), Keith (KPR), CSAR, 2strokenut, RC250, Mark (TOKYO Off-Road) sidecarbod, dmills, MOG, and many others as they had the original test units. And thank James from JD Jetting; he has been a blessing in his ability to improve the other carburetors with a higher standard of jetting; meaning he improved on the original engineers at Mikuni and Keihin. JD’s STIC jetting kit; helped a lot in providing us with needles that work with the STIC. There are hundreds of engine modifications and additional add-on parts out there that can and do influence the engine and its jetting; dmills you are correct; the jetting recommendations are just that (a recommendation); if you find something that works for you, “STIC” with it.
 

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Hot set-up for 500cc engines. Pleased to announce; the JD (STIC) blue tapered needle on the 500cc engines; Millar, Honda, and Kawasaki is the hot set-up when used with the new .113A STIC tube; 200 main jet, 50/52 pilot and air screw at 3 — ½ turns out. As many know, the larger piston has greater suction thus enabling the STIC to sense the change and regulate fuel flow based on demand. The Millar engine with STIC will be featured in an upcoming Motocross Action Magazine 500 shootout article.



Snake Plisken reports the following; contact him at his email.



Snake Plisken [email protected]

To: Frontier-Yahoo Mail

Oct 29 at 9:59 PM. “So far, I like it! Went with initial setting that Millar sent you. More test to follow, acts real crisp and responsive like the old TMX Boswell I have, thanks George.



Sent from my iPhone”
 

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Just had a request for PWK stock metering blocks with gaskets for the PWK shorty and the PWK Screw-top; yes, we have those in stock along with the stock gasket for both. We also have the new STIC blocks for both carburetors. The new STIC for the 85cc is currently in the prototype testing stage and will be available in 2020 March.
 

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STIC and JD Jetting STIC kit at very high altitude. Hey guys, some of these guys do not know about KTM TALK or UK KTM; so, I am posting for them. This guy, Sebastian Cisneros is from Ecuador (South America). He puts in at 9,000 feet and rides to 12,000 feet. His setup is 172 main jet, 50 pilot jet; JD Red (II-II) STIC jetting kit (Top clip); here is his testimonial.





Sebastián Cisneros <[email protected]>

Wed 10/30/2019 6:19 PM

To:

[email protected];

[email protected];

'RK TEK Inc.' <[email protected]>;

'ian turnbull' <[email protected]>;

[email protected];

'Dirtbike Dad' <[email protected]>;

'Sidecarbod.' <[email protected]>;

...

Hello Friends:



Me again from Ecuador trying the STIC in my 2019 Gas-Gas ec300.

The final and PERFECT settings in my altitude (believe or not) is this:



Main Jet: 172

Pilot Jet: 50

Needle: JD STIC (red) 1st Position

3 turns air screw.



It is so clean, so powerful, so AMAZING I had to put a longer gearing. I do HARD ENDURO stuff and I put up an EXTREME ENDURO EVENT (UKUPACHA). My altitude is 3.000 meters above sea level (10.000 feet)



I am so happy. Thanks, Sebastian CIsneros
 

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Thanks to Sidecarbod, James from JD Jetting and others that helped Sebastian Cisneros from Ecuador (South America) to obtaining his jetting specifications using the STIC metering Block and the JD Jetting kit for the STIC. Sebastian is very happy with his settings at +10,000 feet.
 

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STIC; JD Jetting combo; it’s HOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT; STIC metering block, JD Jetting STIC Kit, RK Tech head combo. Here is the newest TOKYO Video depicting Mark’s 250, Phil’s 300 with the STIC metering block, JD Jetting STIC Kit, RK Head combo. Note how clean the throttle is and how much torque and low-speed control they have. These STIC’s are using the new STIC .113A tube with JD Jetting with STIC JD needles. Remember; if you have the earlier STIC blocks with the .114/.115 tubes; send the entire carburetor or complete block back to STIC Headquarters for a free upgrade and free .113A replacement tube. Email Contact [email protected] for details and shipping information.

TOKYO video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiYtYwmKuH4&t=7s
 

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[B]Scott is a newbie to the UK KTM Forum; I am posting for him until he becomes acclimated to the posting procedure. Contact him at his email.
[email protected]
[/B]

Scott Whalen <[email protected]>
Thu 11/7/2019 7:08 AM
To:
[email protected];

I have a 17 KTM 300 XCW six days, the original Mikuni was way too rich & finicky, so I did the JD kit with much improvement but not completely satisfied even after making different adjustments. Then found out that JD had the Keihin with another jet kit so I got it and had better results but still not completely satisfied (had a low rpm bog) btw I do have the RK Tech head and "KTM’s/husky's" heaviest flywheel weight with a Gnarly pipe and short silencer. Then I just happened by chance found out about the STIC metering block while watching Tokyo Off Road and everything sounded better than the Lectron & Smart carb so after talking to George at STIC Fuel I was convinced this was what I needed and last Saturday proved that to be very true! WOW amazing! It feels electric now with a very predictable/linear power delivery, no more low rpm bog, it really feels like a 4 stroke now! Money well spent and from everything I’ve been reading, the STIC outperforms the Lectron and Smart carb plus George was very helpful and even replaced the top of my Keihin (mine was not threaded where the throttle cable screws in). HIGHLY recommend the STIC period! side note; I ride between 1k-5k elevation in central az. mix 60:1 Motorex w premium pump gas. run only bibs, Goldentyre fatty front/120 ibex rear, I weigh 185lbs 60 yrs. young, blah, blah, blah... :)


Check this video by “Tractor” on KTM Talk; this is a KTM 125 with STIC .113A and JD Red II-II needle, 200 main, 50 pilot, and 3 and ½ turns on air screw. Scroll down to picture and then watch.



https://ktmtalk.com/showthread.php?545649-STIC-jetting-thread/page74&highlight=STIC+metering+Block
 

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Posting for Millar racing; 500cc shootout (Motocross Action); STIC equipped with 2.870mm (aka .113A); yes, the 113A works on the 125cc through 500cc engine. JD Red (II-II) and JD Blue (IIII). 215 main jet; 52pilot

https://youtu.be/VO2DFqZU5H8

(Adam Millar): “…. The bike performed flawlessly. I jetted it here on the driveway at 1000’ since it was too wet to go anywhere else. You can hear that the bike is very clean running with no pipe rant on the deceleration. At the shootout we were 1800’ and I’d taken back the 1/16 of an airscrew turn I had given it at 3800’, it was just excellent everywhere. Back home and hounding the guys about the cleanliness of the silencer compared to their drool factory...”

Adam Millar, MRE - Millar Race Engineering
P.O. Box 1237
23012 Hwy 14W
Winkler, MB Canada
R6W 4B3
M (204)823-0010
Shop (204)325-9853
 

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See this posting by “cockroach” on KTM Talk


https://ktmtalk.com/showthread.php?545649-STIC-jetting-thread&p=5425300#post5425300

My STIC experience: I have a 18 150xcw with the following mods: 36 Kehin, V4 Reeds, RK Tek Head, BR8 plug, PV=red spring 2 turns in. It runs great and I have been very happy with the bike once I got it dialed in. However, when you ride a 150 you are always interested in more power. I stumbled on the STIC mod over on TT on the 150 thread. Mog was testing it on a 150 and had very positive things to say. I did some more digging and found this thread and after a lot of back and forth decided to give it a shot. I ordered it direct from STIC with the JD jetting kit. Shipping was quick and installation was easy. I went with the suggested jetting 50pilot, 200 main JD red in the 4th clip position. That turned out to be a little lean. I ended up with a 52 pilot, 200 main JD Blue 5th (bottom) clip position AS 2 turns out. How does it run? Awesome. It has more power everywhere, but the biggest gain seems to be in the midrange. It will pull a gear higher than before in most situations and it is much easier to loft the front wheel in faster 3rd, 4th, and 5th gear situations. It's really a noticeable gain that puts a big grin on my face. My 150 carbureted very cleanly before, but this is next level clean. It feels perfect to me now. Another, unexpected benefit is that it will run down the road at a steady speed now 30-40mph like a 4 stroke! No more hunt and peck that every 2 stroke I have ever owned has done. This is gonna be so nice doing enduros when you get to a road section. I am very happy with it. It was expensive for what you get, but I'm very satisfied with the STIC and recommend it to 150 riders looking for more power. I have no connection to the STIC company or anyone who sells it and I paid full price for the kit.
 

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Notice: We continue to offer free replacement of the earlier .2.900mm (aka .114") tube with the newer 2.870mm (aka .113A") tube; this new tube has tighter tolerances and has an additional emulsion hole to make it exceptionally clean throughout the entire operational range. No worries about the smaller tube outlet flowing enough fuel; a Millar Race Engineering (MRE) 500cc engine using the STIC carburetor with the .113A STIC metering block was the cleanest running engine at the recent Motocross Action Shootout; the set-up was flawless in its overall performance with plenty of fuel and performance on the big end.

https://youtu.be/VO2DFqZU5H8

It is recommended that you use the STIC JD jetting kit. It has two needles; a JD Red (II-II) at .1072" straight section, (.055" tip); and JD Blue (IIII) at .1062" straight section, (.055" tip). The STIC kit comes with additional main jets additional pilot jet; these measurements are approximate. For a fee upgrade send the complete carburetor and block for a thorough new set-up (no charge).

https://youtu.be/6qyuIlSSVf0

JD jetting recently discovered that some of the recent STIC JD jetting kit needles for the STIC metering block may have been mixed with smaller (shorter by 8mm) needles; they have the same scribe marks. The way to determine if you have the shorter wrong needles is to measure the length; they should be approximate 2.6.” contact STIC or JD jetting for free needle replacement. Its clean!

https://youtu.be/WVvycM68ejU

For the free upgrade send to:

STIC Fuel Systems
3730 Hemlock Lane (or P.O. Box 1119)
Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521

Call at 1-715-479-7822
 

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Sandman, contact STIC Headquarters, email at [email protected], we have a gift for you and sidecarbod, be sure to include your handle (Sandman). Inventor X
Hi George, Your post states that you have a gift for me? Is that correct? I assume so, I will email you my details. Currently I am running the older emulsion tube and the settings that I am using do work well (No notch in the 7.0 slide!!!!). If you would like me to test the newer STIC system I am happy to do so!

Regards,

Pete
 

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Also, can you connect me with the Sandman? Send the current shipping address for you and have the "sandman" contact me. Yes, the new STIC block and new .113A tube will be ready this April 14, 2020; state what type; screw-top or shorty.
 

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Also, can you connect me with the Sandman? Send the current shipping address for you and have the "sandman" contact me. Yes, the new STIC block and new .113A tube will be ready this April 14, 2020; state what type; screw-top or shorty.
Hi George, I think you might mean "sand300", he is the guy that lent me his carb so I could compare it with the carb you sent to me, this enabled me to work out that the slide notch was the cause of my issues.
 

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Yes, we have all benefited from our carburetor predecessors. Although the term carburetor and the first patent goes back to 1876 by Luigi DeCristoforis. In 1896 Dr. Wilhelm Maybach and Gottlieb Daimler of Germany teamed up to build a motor car possessing a new float-type spray carburetor, which is the predecessor of most modern designs….” This major change (the float bowl) endures today, over the years, Stromberg, Zenith, Solex, Rayfield, Rochester, Holley, Dellorto, Webber, Mikuni, Keihin, Bing, and many others; great innovators for their time, made significant incremental changes that have improved the carburetor as we know it today.

It may surprise many to know that sophisticated Universities all over the world with very talented scientists, engineers, professors, and financial resources have dedicated their lives to the study of the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) and its related fuel systems including the single main jet carburetor. With these sophisticated universities, their scientist, engineers, and professors; with all their resources including the most recent computer technology, several problems still exist even to this year of 2020.

With the ever-improving speed of computers, close loop sensors, turbo/superchargers; fuel injection, it was easy to give the appearance that the problems were solved, while in fact, technology allowed the cover-up of those problems that have plagued the normally aspirated Internal Combustion Engine with fuel injection or the normally aspirated carburetor to this very day. Due to the fact that the carburetor technical development was abandoned, for the most part, leaving it to utility and recreational engines; this opened the door for those wanting to improve its efficiency.

The normally aspirated single main jet carburetor, other sophisticated multi-jet carburetors, and current fuel injection still suffer from the unpredictability of continuously changing, multiple fluctuating dynamics forces (in excess of 10 variables) of a running engine. This makes predictable calculations incalculable, leaving engineering to trial and error for fuel injection mapping, intake runner length, and carburetor jetting to a process that covers the entire operating spectrum. Even fuel injection calibration is ultimately left to the final human touch for mapping.

See Charles Fayette Taylor’s book: titled: “…. The Internal Combustion Engine in Theory and Practice” ― section: Carburetor Design and Emission control for Spark-Ignition Engines recognizes and describes the missing carburetor link in single jet carburetors…” Taylor: [12]. states the following: “…. The fuel-air ratio should vary as a function of the load under normal steady-running conditions. For the usual type of spark-ignition engine operating under given atmospheric conditions, the load is determined by particular values of any two of the following variables: 1) torque output, 2) speed; 3) throttle position; 4) of airflow, and 5) pressure in the inlet manifold…...” Taylor: “It is evident that the fuel-air ratio required is a unique function of airflow only at a given speed. The steady-state signal analysis varies drastically from the dynamic signal analysis, especially for non-linear systems, Taylor: [5]. “Thus, except in constant-speed applications, an additional control, sensitive to at least one of the variables listed, must be provided if the airflow is to be used as one controlling element….”

It believed with great certainty that the STIC methodology (invention) is able to address the shortcomings of the single jet system by detecting the pressure in the inlet manifold and to provide other inventive features to cause airflow to be a controlling element; thus, the STIC provides all five of the elements that "Taylor" describes in his analysis.
 

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I have a question on this....

Does the needle have the same tuning variation with a STIC fitted as it does without a STIC? Normally on a Keihin you can utilise a large range of needles for different throttle regions once into needle variables.

It seems a bit daft to me to lose the adjustment across all needle ranges? Please explain why the large volume of needles is reduced to just JD red?
 
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