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STIC, It's Hot!

Of those testing the STIC metering block and the carburetors set up by STIC Headquarters; these tests are occurring worldwide on a continuous basis. The tester’s opinions are un-biased and uncensored, their positive reports continue to offer proof that the STIC is unique and there is hard dyno reports along with live field reports that prove the STIC methodology is the real deal. Thanks to following for their efforts to explore the STIC’s features and possibilities: James JD Jetting, MOG, Derek (Harris performance), TOKYO Off-Road, RC250, Sam Evans, Rado (Dirt-n-Iron), Sidecarbod, Steveman, sand300, and many others, thank you. The recent MOG dyno testing is extensive and thorough. This conclusively proves the instant lifting of the front wheel from idle to points in between wide open, the STIC’s improvement in torque and improved acceleration is real.

Re: How good is the STIC?
moggy mx [email protected]
Sun 10/4/2020 11:23 AM
To:
[email protected]

Hi George, this my impressions from doing the dyno work.

The thing I have found with both stock Keihin and the stock Mikuni carb is that they will not adjust to be good in every throttle range. They are so compromised that you are always giving up in one area to gain another, on top of that, I have only ever seen 1 Mikuni carb that had good AFR are across the whole range

My findings with a STIC on multiple applications are, once you understand the STIC system you can quickly get it to have a good AFR across all throttle ranges. Moving onto the STIC power, you can literally dial in in as much quarter throttle power as you could ever desire, we have backed it down slightly to control the power.

In jetting the STIC a little bit richer, I have found that you can get much more power in the quarter and half throttle range, more peak, and more over-rev. The STIC fueling is as good as a fuel injection system. The STIC’s strong power is evident on every bike with better part throttle, full throttle peak, and better over-rev. I cannot see a downside to the STIC other than the rider may not have the ability to make use of STIC’s acceleration and power.

In all the modifications I have done in past +20 years of playing with engines, and fuel systems, nothing has ever worked as well as the STIC, it is consistent across all brands, in fact, the competition is not even close to what the STIC does. The STIC is truly a unique product, I am pleased that I came across it when Derek Harris sent me one to test.

Kind regards Marcus

2020 TC 250 dynos using stic ,pc pipe , dep shorty , PV springs

Rado (Dirt-n-Iron) new video depicting changing the rear sprocket from a #50 to a #48 to lessen the STIC’s violent acceleration.

 

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Congratulations to Mike and Tony Alessi for their October 03, 2020, win of the Wiseco Two-Stroke World Championship with a STIC Carburetor supplied by STIC headquarters. Again, our congratulations to Mike Alessi on his STIC equipped 125, he wins the Wiseco 2020 Two-Stroke World Championship.

Talessi800801 [email protected] Sun 10/4/2020 9:38 PM
To:
[email protected]
IMG_1159.PNG
ATT00001.txt
George, Mike won 2 stroke World Championship with STIC system. Please let me know if you are interested in advertising this,

kind regards, Tony Alessi

Here is the “STIC to Win” video
 

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Error in the first posting, the STIC equipped bike was a 250cc he is on the Yellow bike number #800, notice he gets the Hole-Shot in both Motos.

Here is the “STIC to Win”
 

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Here is the “STIC to Win” video Moto 1 and 2.

We have confirmation that the Mike Alessi bike #800 that won the WISCO Two-Stroke World Championship, was a 325cc engine that was using the STIC PWK Carburetor supplied by STIC Headquarters. We will get other details as they come in. Tony Alessi told Derek Harris, (Tony) “…. the STIC helped the 325 a lot…” We will find out which other accessories the bike had, information is still coming in. Congratulations to Tony Alessi for reaching out to us for the STIC carburetor, and congratulations to Mike Alessi for a great Hole Shot and a great win for Mike Alessi.

Here is the “STIC to Win” video Moto 1 and 2.
 

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STIC for the 2020 World Championship Pro Two-stroke Win:

Mike Alessi’s STIC equipped 2020 World Championship Pro Two-Stroke win. Here is his combination of parts. The Engine is a 250 Yamaha with an Eddie Sanders 325 big bore kit, Eddie Sanders head, and pipe. Eddie Sanders offered a contingency bonus of 20,000 if the Pro Open two-stroke winner was using the Eddie Sanders engine. Mike Alessi with the Eddie Sanders Yamaha 325 won over $27,000 for his first-place win. The Eddie Sanders 325 was equipped with the following. Jetting of the STIC by Derek Harris Performance.

  • STIC Metering block 19E, the carburetor is a stock 38mm Keihin A/S PWK with STIC metering system: 190 main jet, 52 pilot jet, JD Red STIC (II II) Clip # 3, AS 1 ½ turns, #7 slide.

  • Eddie sanders custom head.

  • Eddie Sanders pipe.

  • Custom piston,

  • Vortex ignition with XPR mapping, VP MRX02 fuel. Rekluse Tork drive clutch with red springs

  • Race Tech suspension.
 

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Newsletter #82 Mike Alessi’s statement

Answer to the mystery of the STIC block and jetting selection. There are two STIC blocks, 19E is for the shorty (75mm) and the 19M is for the screw top (90mm). The tubes range from .116” to .113A, to improve the low rpm operation an additional emulsion hole was added, thus, the “A” series. Presently we used two tubes. 113A for 250 to 500, and the .114A for the 125 through 200. The use of the two different tubes is up to the tuner’s selection, they have similar features that can be manipulated by the needle selection. For example, the larger bore engines have greater piston displacement (suction), and the preferred tube is the 113A. The smaller engines like the 125cc run cleaner with the 114A. Here is a quote from Mike Alessi received this morning:

This is a precise quote from Mike Alessi received this morning of 10/8/2020

Talessi800801 [email protected]

Thu 10/8/2020 5:52 AM

To:
[email protected]

Flag for follow up. Start by Thursday, October 08, 2020. Due by Thursday, October 08, 2020.

Mike Alessi quote: (Mike): “…... I like to come off the start at very-low rpm on the 325cc. The STIC system allows me to come off at low rpm and pulls clean and hard into the meat of the power, it gave me the biggest jumps in both Pro Motos which led to both hole shots.”

Mike’s statement affirms what MOG has found, the STIC does product large torque gains just off idle. So, you will know the pilot jet starts to blend in just off idle. At the race, the temps were over 100F, thus the reason for the 190 main and the larger 52 pilot. This allowed a clean off idle acceleration and then the 52-pilot jet blended in, and with the air screw at 1 ½ turns, this made the pilot jet richer, thus adding a greater power jet enrichment. Over the last 8-years of testing we have found the STIC main jet can operate from a 178 to 220 and the pilot selection can vary between 44 and 55, this allows the tuner to work with the STIC’s features depending on what he determines is best for his application. We let our testers have a free hand in their exploratory efforts, it has made the STIC a better product. When we send the product out, it has a safe universal jetting package. For example the 300 ships with a 190 main jet, 50 pilot, recommended air screw 3 ½ turns, with a JD red needle (II II), the 125cc ships with a 205 main jet, 52 pilot jet, Red needle (II II) 3 ½ turns on the air screw. These are basic settings with the final selection being up to the end user. To offer even greater tuning refinement, we are adding a newly designed “White” needle with a longer straight section, this will allow greater tuning features by just moving the clip position. This was designed by James from JD Jetting and is being exhaustively tested on the dyno and field tested. Here is what we know, the STIC is a unique new invention that works, it may not be for some people, however, a majority find it is a very powerful concept in the hands of those that want to explore its possibilities.
 

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Even Greater STIC details

Here are two videos that are prime examples of the STIC’s pressure sensitive sensing feature. The STIC has a sensing passage (Auto Selection) that connects the top of the jet tube with the pilot jet and its connective air passages including the intake tract. This allows the tube outlet to see several different pressures at the same time; this is STIC’s inventive “Auto Selection” feature. This causes the STIC to have an extraordinary differential pressure drop (low pressure, vacuum) 100% of the time the engine is running; this occurs above the wet fuel level, which is contrary to all prior art carburetors. The normal carburetor under hard instant acceleration, the intake differential pressure is temporarily “zero.”
The STIC “Auto Selection” feature sees a minimum of 10 times greater differential pressure drop than a standard carburetor. This is like an artificial remotely located super-vacuum; causing all connective higher pressures to flow toward the STIC’s low pressure drop without having to flow through the fluid in the float bowl; truly a unique STIC concept. This STIC concept causes a super low pressure above the wet level in the main tube and pilot jet, as you may know, a lower pressure above a liquid such as gasoline will cause a degree of vaporization, thus accounting for the STIC’s instant reaction. Further, the STIC has an aggressive acceleration system located in the tubes outer cavity that communicates with the central tubes longitudinal axis; I would tell you the calculated acceleration pressure; however, that is confidential.
In essence the STIC is changing the air fuel delivery rate 100% of the time the engine is running without moving the throttle, although the rider can move the throttle, when you are going up a grade the intake pressure is increasing and the STIC is automatically sensing ever-changing differential pressure to cause a variable air fuel delivery rate. This is evidenced in these two videos: one by Mark from TOKYO Off-Road, and the other by Rado from Dirt-N-Iron. Although I know how it works; amazingly, MOG was the first to document this STIC feature when he came up with the ¼ throttle test, thank you MOG, you revealed the STIC’s aggressive torque feature. The instant acceleration and torque from low speed is evidenced in the following videos. If any of you want to see pictures of the Alessi hole-shots send me your email or contact MOG as I forwarded pictures to him. I do not know how to post it on this site, considering the competition the hole-shots are massive and impressive.
Mark, TOKYO
Rado, Dirt-N-Iron
 

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Congratulations
!              Alessi image1.jpeg
Mike Alessi STIC Equipped 38mm Keihin Air Striker on his Yamaha 325cc, he won the Hole Shot on both of the Pro Open Motos, and won the Two-Stroke Wiseco World Championship; winnings first place worth $27,000, congratulation Mike.
 

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Newsletter #84

Mike Alissa’s #800 engine and chassis components (info received October 8, 2020).
This message indicating the engine components is from Talessi for the 325 ESR engine which was running the STIC Metering block, jetted 190 main jet, 52 pilot jet, #7 slide, A/S 1 ½ turns out. The Temperature was over 100 degrees Fahrenheit; the bike was Jetted based on Derek Harris Performance recommendations.

From: Talessi800801 [email protected]
Sent: Thursday, October 8, 2020 9:37 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: Re: alessi 800 bike parts

The Eddie Sanders Racing combination is a ESR 325 kit. The ESR 325 kit comes with ESR head, ESR cylinder, piston ESR pipe. Mike Alessi’s Yamaha #800, was using the 19E STIC Metering block, the carburetor is a stock 38mm Keihin A/S PWK with STIC metering system: 190 main jet, 52 pilot jet, JD Red STIC (II II) Clip # 3, AS 1 ½ turns, #7 slide.

(1): Eddie sanders custom ESR head, (2): Eddie Sanders pipe, (3): Custom piston, (4): Vortex ignition with (5): XPR mapping, (6): VP MRX02 fuel, (7): Rekluse Tork drive clutch with red springs, (8): Race Tech suspension, (9): The 125cc engine was using a VHM head.

Recent postings by MOG (Thumper Talk) October 9, 2020
(MOG): “…. One thing I do not think I really mentioned this. The settings as delivered by George were the most powerful. The AFR on all throttle settings was really good ,the only change for max power would be 50% was a tad lean ,half a clip or a full clip would have been as good as you can get, pretty amazing I think. We only changed it to detune the part throttle slightly and give it a bigger margin for error for UK winter. I think everyone should be reassured that George knows how to get it real close as delivered.”
October 9, 2020, Thumper Talk’s mxaniac response to MOG.
(mxaniac): “…. Thanks for posting those. I have never seen any 1 single change (emphasis added, STIC) have that much affect, especially not bolt on. It is quite impressive.”

2020 TC 250 dynos using stic ,pc pipe , dep shorty , PV springs
 

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Newsletter #86

The STIC powerful and potentially runs cleaner

Over the past 9-years of STIC development, there have been numerous unsolicited dynamometer (hereinafter referred to as dyno) runs (at the persons own expense). They compared well jetted Mikuni’s to the STIC, and well jetted stock PWK Keihin’s compared to the STIC by just installing the STIC metering block in the same Keihin carburetor. We knew we were on the right track to proceed as the seat of the pants testing was good. After successful field testing by Keith and Dan Peterson, we decided to test on a chassis dyno. The seat of the pants was verified on the dyno; incidentally, these test was with the early 115 tube. The first dynamometer tests were conducted at a Ducati Motorcycle shop, these test were conducted on the same day within 20 minutes of each other; after the exhaust temps were brought up to the same temperatures; we proceeded with the test, the dyno test results were positive and they supported the seat of the pants testing, all test were conducted on the same bike, a 2007 Yamaha YZ250.

After these successful tests, we asked various people if they were interested in testing the new STIC metering system. We sent product to Derek Harris Performance, then, Derek and STIC sent test units to local US persons and then all over the globe, including MOG, Mark from TOKYO Off-Road, and others

The following dyno reports testing KX 250, from Ed’s Motorcycle, Spoken, Washington, measured horsepower, torque, and emission testing. From an emissions standpoint there are several tell-tale measurements that equate to better more efficient combustion. These are higher CO2 (Carbon Dioxide) readings along with lower CO (Carbon Monoxide) readings. Under ideal combustion, the engine would produce higher amounts of exothermic by-products (heat), consisting of CO2 and H2O (water). At the peak (9,000 rpms) the STIC produced 40.3 hp and the Stock well-jetted Keihin produced 34.6 hp. At this same point, the stock carburetor had a CO reading of 8.6, and a CO2 reading of 4.1. During the STIC’s peak, the CO reading was 6.2, and the CO2 was 6.0, indicating better combustion. This equates to a better HP and Torque gains

40.3 STIC peak HP; torque 23.5
34.6 Stock peak HP torque 20.3

8.6 CO stock (bad)
6.2 CO STIC (good)

4.1 CO2 stock (bad)
6.0 CO2 STIC (good)

In summary, there was no attempt to perfect the KX 250’s STIC jetting. There are many field and dyno tests throughout the world that show the STIC works very well. In the event these dyno reports do not post, contact [email protected] and I will email them to you.

See the following dyno run from Derek Harris Performance and his statement:

Derek: “…. testing the STIC metering block on a stock YZ250 with FMF pipe and Bud silencer. Highest HP we have seen on a stock cylinder and head ever. 5 of 5 stars in performance…”

 

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Thanks Jay Clark from Dirt Bike TV for your recent October 10, 2020 posting of your testing of the STIC Metering Block on a Keihin PWK 38mm shorty. We know it is better than the Mikuni and it is an improvement over the Stock Keihin. Jay thanks for your efforts and time.

We also know the STIC works with an assortment of aftermarket parts like the RK Tech head and other heads, as well as different pipes, ignition systems, and various engine kits like the ESR engine kit. Our praise goes to Tony Alessi for building a great # 800 bike, it takes a lot of skill to put the right parts together for a winning combination; and then you have to add the great skills and determination of Mike Alessi to make it all happen.

This Jay Clark 300 already had a Keihin on it, and so did Mike Alessi’s Yamaha ESR 325 # 800 bike; that won the Wiseco 2020 World Two-stroke Championship.

 

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Newsletter #95

New video from Mark, TOKYO Off-Road October 12, 2020, and from Jay Dirt Bike TV October 10, 2020 showing the STIC’s ability to function at altitudes of 6,000' to 8,500' and +10,000' feet in low speed acceleration and deceleration scenarios. These videos are with the STIC’s latest 113A tube, JD Red (STIC) needle (II II), air screw at 3 ½ turns out. As I said before the STIC has great flexibility in main jet selection. These bikes had preset jetting ranging from 180 to 195, this depending on conditions as well as rider preference, the STIC jetting will operate with main jets ranging from 178 through 215, the more powerful settings use the larger main and larger pilot jets; it depends on what the rider likes. The Mike Alessi ESR 325cc bike during the race had track temperatures of over 1000 degrees (F), it was jetted with a 190 main jet, 50 pilot, air screw at 1 ½ turns out. This jetting selection was made by Derek, Harris Performance, and by using the lesser air screw setting this made the power circuit richer, thus, blending more fuel into the main jet tube at the higher rpms. The STIC can more effectively utilize the available oxygen content; reason being the air into the tube must pass through the designed emulsion orifices, forcing it to merge with the fuel. These adiabatic air fuel passages are vectored in the direction of the central flow’s longitudinal axis and enter tangent to the central flows outer peripheral; this arrangement helps scrub off much of the flows boundary layer drag, thus improving the flow rate. You know I am getting older (78) and I thought you should know, it is not Snake oil or blue sky, it is the real deal, eh!

Mark from TOKYO Off-Road


Jay from Dirt Bike TV


Mike Alessi #800 Yamaha MSR 325cc, 2020 Wisco Two-Stroke World Champion

 

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George, I suspect the track temperature was more like 100 F not 1000 F :p
 

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You are correct even though it was hot as hell, it was not Hell; it was 100 degrees, thanks for your observation.
If you are quick you might still be able to edit the post, having said that at some point in time the edit function is no longer available. (Click on the three vertical dots, top right of the post).
 

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STIC mileage is better.

Recent testing of a STIC equipped Keihin carburetor indicates fuel mileage is better than the same stock Keihin carburetor, providing you drive it reasonable. Under controlled conditions with a measured fuel container and riding the test bike with the same Keihin carburetor at the same speed, in this case 30 mph, the STIC increases the mpg by 10%. The stock Keihin tube outlet is .1142” with the STIC tube outlet being .1129,” the outlet along with the needle diameter controls the fuel outlet orifice size.

The stock Keihin tube outlet is .1142” with the core being .1440” and the stock needle straight section is .1055” thus, a difference of .0087.” The STIC tube outlet is .1129” and core is .1490” and the JD Red needle (II II) straight section is .1080” with the difference being .0049” with the STIC tube and red needle combination being .0038” smaller. During normal riding (on the same bike) at lower speeds, in this case 30 mph for the test, the STIC metering block ran smoother and used 10% less fuel. We know the STIC is capable of high performance, and if you are prone to experience this high-performance feature, then expect to use a little more fuel. Mark from TOKYO Off-Road reports no noticeable difference.

Here are the reasons why, if you improve the engines performance without changing anything on the engine except for improving the fuel mixing process; it stands to reason that you have improved the combustion process, and this equates to better performance and mileage.
 
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