KTM Owners Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, just wonder if you have the bars shake at about 40mph? quite a violent shake
then it goes when you speed up?...i think maybe its rear suspension too stiff?
checked head bearings seem ok, seems to eat front tyres too, got those metzler tyres
on pretty soft wonder if they are shit? this will be xmas bike fixing you see ,its been like it a while so now is time to sort it
thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,622 Posts
screen ? Mate has one but doesn't post and i've ridden his with no shake at all... i know he's experimented with various screen choices in the last year but that's more been for higher speeds
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,731 Posts
Bet it's tyres. Could be badly balanced. might just not suit the bike. My SMT used to get evil head shakes at certain speeds. Couldn't find a thing wrong with the chassis or suspension. Changed screens, mirrors, took off hand guards. Made no difference. Binned the Metzeler Z8 tyres and put of some Dunlop Roadsmarts and instant calmness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Knapper, i reckon its tyres ....i just have a feeling...but could be wrong...makes you loathed to change tyres that are pretty good still doh
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,622 Posts
Knapper, i reckon its tyres ....i just have a feeling...but could be wrong...makes you loathed to change tyres that are pretty good still doh
Just becuase you take them off doesn;t mean you have to bin them. If you find it's not the tyres you can use them again...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
937 Posts
I now have what I would call a slight shimmy on the front when coasting, seems to come in about 45 mph and only happens (or should I say can only be felt) when slowing down whilst coasting. If you take your hands off the bars you can see them shake a little.
My V-strom 650 did the same but the shaking was more violent.

The cause for me are the crappy TrailAttack 2's.
Their tread pattern has big ridges across the tyre and these suffer from scalloping as they wear, and when that happens it seems to shake the bars at about 40.

Thankfully on the TA3's they've ditched that tread pattern.
So.. you can check your front tyre with a torch. Shine it down the tyre (along the surface at a low angle) and on either side (just off the centre) you should see lips (or dips). If so this is likely the cause.
Getting a new tyre for my V-strom cured it, and next year I probably bin the TA2 I have on my 1190.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
i experienced this when I had my 990 adv r. When de accelerating with my hands off the bars around 40 mph. I wasn’t able to cure it completely but it was improved greatly as follows. Trued front wheel to perfection. Balanced front wheel to perfection, included reseating in circumference the front tyre on rim to reduce amount of balance weight used. I feel it was def front wheel tyre combo, was always perfect when holding the bars though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Rear tyre, first thing I'd check.
well this was my thought,its that feeling when i ride dirt bike and rear is all wrong suspension and tyre allways cures it , road bike might be different?
trouser we have looked at front to see if its misshapen , its ok not too bad , and as i said this thing seems to eat tyres as in distorted really fast , i reckon as its BF bike he needs a 1190 lol i have gone from kinda liking mine to bloody love the thing! at first i loved 1090 but thats soon faded :D i will report back the findings ,xmas in bike sheds it is!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,731 Posts
When the rear is gone on mine now I change them both as a pair. Not cheap every 3-4000 miles but I get a sweet handling bike at all times.
Adventure bikes with centralised mass and a lot of weight transfer fore and aft seem to eat front tyres. I've never got anywhere near the legal limit on a front tyre before it's change. If they don't scallop they'll go thruppenny bit. If you stand up when you're riding and look down on the front you can see it clear as day. When my front goes like that, whatever the tread depth, it's history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,928 Posts
Check your wheel alignment, I ve found even small misalignment makes a big difference to stability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,588 Posts
Did you fit front wheel properly? i.e, fit wheel, nip one pinch bolt, torque spindle, undo pinch bolt, bounch up and down as hard as you can then do all pinch bolts to correct torque?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
As per Frog and Shipdamite. Reset the front wheel and ensure it’s torqued correctly. Then check rear to front wheel alignment. Assuming you don’t have a laser alignment kit then just use string around the rear wheel and then run parallel past the front wheel and adjust the rear wheel until the strings either side of the front wheel are equal distance from the wheel. It’s a bit fiddly as every time you move the rear wheel you need to reset the strings but it works very wheel.
If you google it you’ll get a step by step guide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
I now have what I would call a slight shimmy on the front when coasting, seems to come in about 45 mph and only happens (or should I say can only be felt) when slowing down whilst coasting. If you take your hands off the bars you can see them shake a little.
My V-strom 650 did the same but the shaking was more violent.
My 1090 did this, but only noticeable if taking both hands off bars whilst coasting down, that was on the OE Metzeler Tourance Nexts, had a few other bikes do this over the years including my V-Strom 650.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,731 Posts
Never had that with mine. But I gave up on dual purpose tyres within a month of buying the bike. I've since run Metzeler Roadtec 01s, Conti Road Attacks and now, my favourite so far, Road 5s. never had a hint of instability.

I did have an issue with wheel alignment once but it didn't produce bar shaking so much as a choppy ride, as if the forks were sticking. Correcting the alignment solved it immediately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
937 Posts
My 1090 did this, but only noticeable if taking both hands off bars whilst coasting down
Yeh, I'm struggling to remember TBH as it feels like it's been so long since I rode it. Now you mention it I don't think I can feel it yet on my 1190 unless I take both hands off.
I tend to coast and slow down as I approach a village with a 30 limit, and often take both my hands off to stretch them. It's in those situation where I start to notice stuff like that.

My vstrom got so bad it would do it whilst holding the bars, but obviously it was just a shimmy, it would become a near tank slapper with no hands, but only when coasting & slowing down.
I guess braking deforms the tyre so it over powers the wobble (or just changes the contact patch), as does accelerating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Thanks all, think new tyres start from scratch with all what everbody says then see, we never owned Adv bikes before and i reckon you may be right with the tyres go all out of shape way faster, 1090 has a smaller front tyre as well . Road 5s or contis? Thats next dilema lol
Thanks again humans, still getting the old bf interested in a 1190 though....i put seed of dought in his head lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,731 Posts
Tyre wise, both Conti RA3s and Road 5s are equally good. The Michelins have a sports tyre profile so if you like to throw it about a bit they're ideal. They will egg you on. Once past a certain angle of lean they start to tip really quickly. Some riders like that, others find it unsettling. Grip, wet and dry is exceptional and I've not had any problems with a shoulder forming on the joint between the two compounds.

The Contis will also take any amount of spirited riding but they're a more conservative sports touring profile and if you like to rag it the front will wear fairly rapidly and when the rear starts to flatten the steering really slows.

If you're not a hooligan both will offer 5K mileages from the rear. The Michelins give a plusher ride but the Contis offer massive feedback and the stability and amount of sheer bite you get from the front end when it's buried deep into a corner is incredible. I also think the Contis are better in the winter. They warm faster than the Michelins and the feedback inspire great confidence in poor conditions.

If you're coming from dual purpose tyres the Contis are the natural progression and probably the ones to try first. The Michelins will feel very different amd might take more getting used to after duals.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top