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Hello, just wonder if you have the bars shake at about 40mph? quite a violent shake
then it goes when you speed up?...i think maybe its rear suspension too stiff?
checked head bearings seem ok, seems to eat front tyres too, got those metzler tyres
on pretty soft wonder if they are shit? this will be xmas bike fixing you see ,its been like it a while so now is time to sort it
thanks
mine does this if you take hands off the bars and only if the topbox is fitted....take it off no headshakes
 

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The Michelins have a sports tyre profile so if you like to throw it about a bit they're ideal. They will egg you on. Once past a certain angle of lean they start to tip really quickly. Some riders like that, others find it unsettling.....

The Michelins will feel very different and might take more getting used to after duals.
There are a few theories on this Michelin quirk (lots of people online discussing this oddity) but you can see and feel (by touch) that sudden drop-off, which means for a short while the bike is on a narrow knife edge, some people also think / suspect it may also be the change of compounds giving the feeling either alone or combination with that sharp edge....

...Whatever it is I don't like it, I find I am often cornering on that sharp edge and it feels horrible, and for me removes confidence. I did start to gel with it a bit more on a Trip to the Alps where I had much better roads and found myself more often able to throw it over further and faster, but it still shit me up a little each time it crossed that section of the tyre. As for grip I can report no problems wet or dry.

The problem with tyres they can be very personal, a really shit tyre is just that, but all the premium ones are arguably very close and few of us can get near their limits, so it comes down to how we find the feedback at our limits.

Got a set of Road Attack 3's in the garage ready for my next big trip, happy to leave the Michelins on and finish them off over winter / spring on local blasts.
 

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My Mrs loves the Michelins on her MT07 as it makes the bike is so flickable. When I first rode it I though something must be loose because the back end felt like it slid out sideways as to tip it in.
My SD came with Michelins on it and I don't think I got on with them that well. Then the rear squared off and the front triangled and the bike felt horrible.
So I put a pair of battlax bt20 evo's on there and it felt much better. I have since done a track day on them and now regularly take them to within a few mm of the edges, and they feel great.

The BT20's are a much flatter profile, if you look at the back of both our bikes you'd swear mine has a wider rear tyre, yet the are the same size and I've even measured them too. It's just the extra height of the Mich that makes them look skinny.
 

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I find the main problem with instability, bar shake, is the centre profile of the rear tyre. The adventure/dual sport tyres come loaded with a heavy tyre pattern. Once this wears in the centre the foot print of the tyre isn't Uniform. You can mitigate this by changing suspension and tyre pressures. My front tyres curp, wear poorly and feel horrible on the slab but cause very little instability.

I'd suggest if you feel its the front tyre causing bar shake, stick a new rubber ring on the rear and go for a spin next tyre change. Then the next time you have bar shake with a worn rear, change the front tyre and see if that cures the problem. Or just do as I do, just ride the bike with a lower top end speed until you put new hoops on, change your riding habits rather than changing tyres to get the 80+ mph stability.
 

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In over 30,000 miles on the 1090 / 1190 / 1290 I have not had any wear related "issues", new hoops always feel nice, but not yet had any that went really square or badly cupped, back in pre-historic times I had a GPZ900R and then an RG500 with 16" fronts and they would lose their shape really quickly and start to cup.

I have also not had any high speed stability issues - at least not until way into 3 figures with 2 huge metal Panniers and a top box, so cannot blame the tyres for that.

Following on from TS I have noticed many dual sport tyres and sporty-touring tyres have a very rounded shape, my new Conti Road Attack 3's have a way more shallow profile than the Road 5's as do the OE Pirelli Scorpion Trail 2's. Very steep profiled tyres can make you look like a right ponce, I would have to lean further than Rossi to scrub the rear Road 5 to the edge, and further than Marquez to get anywhere near the edge of the front tyre.
 

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Got my Road 5s to the edge. :D

But they don't go there that often and I can tell when they are. And that's the point. On of the reasons I went over to them from the Conti RA3s was because I was on the edge of the Contis far too often. On every other ride I was getting that warning shimmy that Contis give you when you reached the limit. It isn't a nice feeling to be halfway round a bend and needing more lean so you don't run wide, only to be told by your tyres that you can't have any. At least Contis tell you when you've reached the limit. Most tyres don't and a half barrel profile makes it hard to gauge where you are on them through the seat of the pants, so you won't know you're close to overcooking it until it's too late.

It's all very well having no chicken strips but unlike proper sports rubber, sports touring tyres aren't intended to spend too much time on their edge, especially not on an adventure bike with a high centre of gravity and skinny wheels. It might give you bragging rights at your local bike meet but it leaves you with no margin for error, and feedback and stability is greatly reduced. It's a low-side waiting to happen.
Sports tyres are at least designed for edge grip. The Road 5s have the same profile as the sports Power RS's and feature a wide, stable and grippy edge strip which you can feel distinctly when you get onto it so you know where you are on the tyre. Better to have a grippy, sporty tyre with a bit of a strip on it than a touring tyre with no safety margin left.
 

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I had exactly the same issue with my 1190, slowing down from speed between 50-40mph it would have a pretty violent shake. Never got to the bottom of it so I just stopped slowing down.
 
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