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Zero tyre pressure and no option to go for anything other than zero. Having said that I don't like the design of the Tubliss where the low pressure valve sits, for starters you need a shed load of lead to balance the wheel.

No 21" front tyre fitment for this new system, that's not very good.
 
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This should be fun!

There’s Traxy, Nomousse and the mad thick tube system (can’t think of the name). All trying to do what Tubliss or tubes do but in a different way. A lot of it depends where you ride and also how you ride that terrain. You wouldn’t use a super traction system for something like WEC. Likewise you be bonkers to turn up at the Tough One with a brand new mousse and brand new tyre.

What you needs is a shed load of cash. That solves everything as you can’t have spare wheels with all your favourite fillers on ready to go. Easy then.

All the new pneumatic systems are all based on what 4x4s have used as bead lockers for yonks. It’s fantastic till the pneumatic bit doesn’t work. Then you need a mechanical method. Tubliss is the only one that has/gives you a back up.
 

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If you wanted to design a product which was the worst of all worlds, that would be it.. :ROFLMAO: :LOL: :ROFLMAO:
100%!

I’d like to know what happens when any other system than Tubliss goes pop? I’ve not used anything else. How is a tyre held on when the air support is lost? At least on Tubliss you have three different things. 1. Tyre air pressure. 2. Inner core pressure. 3. Rim lock valve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
100%!

I’d like to know what happens when any other system than Tubliss goes pop? I’ve not used anything else. How is a tyre held on when the air support is lost? At least on Tubliss you have three different things. 1. Tyre air pressure. 2. Inner core pressure. 3. Rim lock valve.
Even mousses are not infallible there given their recommendation not to use rim locks.

I look at this way, I don’t race anymore but ride alone a lot and cover a lot ground from here to Wales, our lass would have zero chance of bringing a trailer or even the truck, so I have to be absolutely self sufficient, yes I can ring a mate or my brother but I would be mortally embarrassed if I ever had to do so so the system I HAVE to use is the best tool less system, not that I don’t carry a shit load.

Horses for course’s


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Don’t forget it’s only Michelin that say no rim locks……as long as you use their tyres and the mousse is less than six months old. As riders, we want to make a product that was designed in the 80s for desert racing (at the highest speeds) work for 21st century hard enduro. The non puncture bit is stretched by a long way for modern use. Michelin might change their info but I doubt it.
 

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Like tubliss and others it still uses air pressure to keep the tyre on the rim/bead if you lose the air you are stuffed. A rim lock or even 2 will not keep the tyre on the bead.

But I know a system that will ;)
 

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Edward self tapper hands?

I’ve seen it done in trials. It’d be amazing to get a rim built by a tyre company that means they can design the disaster free, all terrain/use tyre. Tread patterns help but aren’t the end of the world if you have a good footprint- hence trials tyres.

Lee, you have to get your method out there!
 

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Just a thought, any one ever tried an enduro tyre on a tubeless trials rear rim? they have a ring to hold the bead on tight and they run trials tyres at what about 4 psi without the tyre coming off the bead.
That said trials bikes are not often used powering hard out of corners and drifting which is what would cause the tyre to be pushed off the bead if anything did.
The trials rims do not even use a rim lock!
 

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Just a thought, any one ever tried an enduro tyre on a tubeless trials rear rim? they have a ring to hold the bead on tight and they run trials tyres at what about 4 psi without the tyre coming off the bead.
That said trials bikes are not often used powering hard out of corners and drifting which is what would cause the tyre to be pushed off the bead if anything did.
The trials rims do not even use a rim lock!
You need the bead to be suitable for tubless rims too. It's very hard to break a trials rear bead without using a tool such as a bead breaker or a spade or a big lump of wood etc. Whereas an enduro tyre is just pushed off by hand/knee.
 

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You need the bead to be suitable for tubless rims too. It's very hard to break a trials rear bead without using a tool such as a bead breaker or a spade or a big lump of wood etc. Whereas an enduro tyre is just pushed off by hand/knee.
Yes forgetting about the enduro tyre bead, thinking it seals in tubeliss but that works in a different way. The fact the trials tyre is more difficult to break the bead is more I think to do with the ring/recess/step or what ever it is called on the rim than it is the bead.
 

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The fact the trials tyre is more difficult to break the bead is more I think to do with the ring/recess/step or what ever it is called on the rim than it is the bead.
It's a bit of both, trials tyres are made for either tubless or tubes. I imagine the tubless tyres have to meet a certain tolerance/spec as do the rims they are made for. I know IRC have had a problem in the past with their trials tyres burping air when taking a big hit.

Michelin X11s take considerably more air to seat on an enduro rim than an enduro tyre, but they do push off quite easily, so the ridge definitely has a role.

At the end of the day, air can leak so if a system relies on air, then it's fallible.
 

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Thought I would add..
Michelin bib mousse. Metzeller MC360 mid-soft. Green laning. Really good tires and good set up.
I have had the tire spin around on the rear rim before. So I run 2 rim locks in the rear and 1 rim lock in the front. I have had the same set for 5 years now and they are still good. Just use loads of mousse lube when you change the tire. I have had stuff through the tire that would have killed tubliss or a tube and I have dented the rims and its all still good. Hope that helps.
 

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It won’t pop unless fitted by a mong that’s nipped the inner tube when fitting. Easily done if you don’t work in the right manner. I reckon it’d be amazingly rare to get a steel spike right through everything unless you ride around scrap heaps. If that’s your bag use a mousse.
 
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I have to admit. I have ridden a bike with tubliss and it is very nice, better than my mousse. Especially with very low tire pressures. Really nice soft feel and nice grip.

I'm just not sold on anything that is not 100% puncture proof for what I do. Its just not it for me. My friends, some of them have tubliss and will not ride with mousse. I have had a couple of punctures and I said to myself that I would never have that again.

Since having mousses I have had a lump of metal that had gone right through my tire, through my mousse and hit the base of the rim inside. I didn't even know it was there until I got back. I just pulled it out and when I put a new tire on, that as when I realised that it had gone all the way though and hit the inside of the rim. As far as I am concerned the bib mousse system is bomb proof and if you look after them and fit them properly they last for years. Mine are 5 years old and nothing wrong with them.

I guess it depends on what you do and what you are happy with. But I won't run anything with air in it anymore for what I do. Although I do sometimes still miss that soft feel over bumps.

Changing tires can be a pain for some people I have to admit and this can be very off putting having to get mousses fitted, because it costs money. I invested in a 3 minute tire changer and it has paid for itself in 18 months. Now I am a ninja tire changer. Not quite 3 minutes though 🤪
 
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