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Hello Guys,

Im looking for suggestions for tyres that would suit a 80/20 trail / tarmac split.

I would be riding 5 miles to the trail on tarmac and 5 miles back on tarmac and in between just short hops connecting up routes.

I dont need performance on the tarmac and I am happy just to cruise to the trail.

The type of riding will be forest trails and a bit of single track.

These will be for a Husqvarva FE450.

Chris........:)
 

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If it's just trail riding then those Mitas XT754 are decent value, road legal and will last a fair while. If you want something better allround and more stable on road maybe Metz 6day in the standard harder compound.
If you want really good grippy offroad, road legal tires then Mich enduro Mediums Front & rear but won't last as well as harder compound stuff.

Or Maybe Michelin Trekkers, not tried them myself but cheaper and road legal
 

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If it's just trail riding then those Mitas XT754 are decent value, road legal and will last a fair while. If you want something better allround and more stable on road maybe Metz 6day in the standard harder compound.
If you want really good grippy offroad, road legal tires then Mich enduro Mediums Front & rear but won't last as well as harder compound stuff.

Or Maybe Michelin Trekkers, not tried them myself but cheaper and road legal
I asked about getting the wheels balanced at my local tyres shop on my 500 to make it a bit better on the road , but he said it could be done but it would take a lot of weights and not to bother!!
I’ll be trying trackers next!


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Get some heavy duty solder (lead based) and coil it around spokes. Use 200mm lengths tightly coiled up to the nipple. Works a treat and make speed on the road smooth. It also makes your suspension have an easier life.
 

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Or Maybe Michelin Trekkers, not tried them myself but cheaper and road legal
I have tracker rear and will replace fron (Goldentyre) with Tracker when it is worn out and a mate has trackers fitted, we find them fine as relative off road novices just riding for fun.

Lots more tread depth compared to Mich Medium and I doubt at my level I would notice much difference in performance, but I do notice the 50% cost saving.
 

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I found that with Tubliss I would feel the front wheel pogoing up and down on the road. I bought a set of these and added them and moved them until I had balanced the wheel. Just used a broom handle levelled on a few plastic boxes. Worked a treat. Made in UK Reusable Balancing Weights for Spoked Motorcycle Wheel motor bike | eBay
Hi rob
Not to seem toothick!, but can you just explain in a bit more details how you balanced the wheel! How do you know we’re to put the weights?


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I set up the broom handle vertically resting on the boxes. Put the broom through the wheel so it could rotate freely, then held the wheel steady, letting go of the wheel the heavy part will fall to the bottom. I then put weights directly opposite the bottom and tried again. with a bit of adjustment the wheel won’t rotate when you let go as it’s lost the heavy spot.

crude, but on a dirt bike it was enough to remove the issue.
 

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Get some heavy duty solder (lead based) and coil it around spokes. Use 200mm lengths tightly coiled up to the nipple. Works a treat and make speed on the road smooth. It also makes your suspension have an easier life.
Yep, exactly what I did as the tubliss rim lock is a gert lump. Makes a lot of difference over 40mph.

I'd say go for trackers.
 

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Just remove your pads/caliper and bushes/seals. Hang the wheel on the axle or any hard surface rod in forks again and it’ll spin nicely. Once the front is right the rear will feel lumpy so you can repeat here but remove the chain.

One thing I found with balanced wheels is you can get away with a far steeper steering angle- raise forks in the clamps. There’s no oscillation to set off a tank slapper so you can benefit from a real aggressive turning bike. Great if you do woods/technical riding or are a slower rider wanting ease of turning. You can then still go fast over open bumpy ground without fear of the bike getting excited.
 

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Just remove your pads/caliper and bushes/seals. Hang the wheel on the axle or any hard surface rod in forks again and it’ll spin nicely. Once the front is right the rear will feel lumpy so you can repeat here but remove the chain.

One thing I found with balanced wheels is you can get away with a far steeper steering angle- raise forks in the clamps. There’s no oscillation to set off a tank slapper so you can benefit from a real aggressive turning bike. Great if you do woods/technical riding or are a slower rider wanting ease of turning. You can then still go fast over open bumpy ground without fear of the bike getting excited.
So is it not just easier to get the wheels balanced at the tyre shop?
Why don’t they like to do this?
It sounds like it improves the bike.


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I'm running 2 rear rim locks and no front rim locks and that's with mousses. Smooth as..... 😀
 

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And I'm now on Michelin Enduro Medium. These tyres are really good, and they are the best all rounders I've used.
Most tyres tend to be really good at certain terrain, and shit at others, and sometimes downright dangerous, particularly on wet and greasy tarmac. These Michelins just work well at everything off road, and have good predictable road manners.
 

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No need for weights. The solder wrap works perfect and is cheap....
 
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